Introduction to Tai Chi Chuan.

When the western world thinks of a martial art it inevitably thinks of kicking, punching, fighting and body contact. It does not generally think of health, peace, relaxation  and inner calm. However, that is exactly what the martial art of Tai Chi offers. Slow, flowing, meditative movements.

Tai Chi consists of harmoniously designed movements that flow imperceptibly into one and another to make the forms which we see performed in the parks and gardens of China. The movements are varied and bring together every part of the body, from the smallest joints to the largest muscles. Bringing into play the entire human body with out creating stress. The continually changing patterns helps keep the practitioner mentally alert and physically flexible. Because Tai Chi is practised slowly, it has often been referred to as a moving meditation.

Records show that Tai Chi dates back several thousand years and has its roots in traditional Chinese  medicine. Originally Tai Chi was designed for self defence and to promote inner peace and calm and is safe for any one to practice throughout their lives without fear of injury. The practice of Tai Chi enhances the flow of natural energy throughout the body, clearing any blockages that may exist and results in the internal organs being strengthened, making the whole body healthier, improving both physical and mental health and recommended by the NHS, complementing western medicine in the approach to increased mobility and recovery from common ailments and injuries.